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Prayer

“I find that all my thoughts circle around God like the planets around the sun, and are as irresistibly attracted by Him. I would feel it to be the grossest sin if I were to oppose any resistance to this force.” “Memories, Dreams, Reflections” C. G. Jung, 1952 Explanation: According to Jung works, God is inside our psyche as well as outside. God is everywhere. But the God we can talk to is inside our psyche – the Self. We should be able to hear and dialogue with the Self using dreams and active imagination. Connection: For Jung, the Self is symbolized by the circle (especially when divided into four quadrants), the square, or the mandala. In my painting it was depicted as the earth with four trees and a prayer inside.
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Unconscious identity (sold)

“As scientific understanding has grown, so our world has become dehumanized. Man feels himself isolated in the cosmos, because he is no longer involved in nature and has lost his emotional “unconscious identity” with natural phenomena. These have slowly lost their symbolic implications. Thunder is no longer the voice of an angry god, nor is lightning his avenging missile. No river contains a spirit, no tree is the life principle of a man, no snake the embodiment of wisdom, no mountain cave the home of a great demon. His contact with nature has gone, and with it has gone the profound emotional energy that this symbolic connection supplied. This enormous loss is compensated for by the symbols of our dreams.” “Man and his symbols” by C.G.Jung Explanation: The basic idea behind Jungian dream theory is that dreams reveal more than they conceal. They are a natural expression of our imagination and use the most straightforward language at our disposal: mythic narratives. Dreams are doing the work of integrating our conscious and unconscious lives; he called this the process of individuation.
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Transformation

“Through the study of these collective transformation processes and through understanding of alchemical symbolism I arrived at the central concept of my psychology: the process of individuation” Volume 7, “Memories, Dreams, Reflections” by C.G. Jung Explanation: C.G. Jung spent all his life learning the processes of development and transformation of our psyche (individuation). Individuation can be defined as the achievement of self-actualization through a process of integrating the conscious and the unconscious. Connection: The image of the butterfly, which is born a caterpillar, turns into a cocoon, and later blossoms into a winged insect, has always fascinated humankind. This process was seen as a reflection of our own spiritual transformation.
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The Self

“The self is our life’s goal, for it is the completest expression of that fateful combination we call individuality, the full flowering not only of the single individual, but of the group, in which each adds his portion to the whole.” Volume 2, “The collected works” by C.G. Jung Explanation: The Self in Jungian psychology is one of the Jungian archetypes, signifying the unification of consciousness and unconsciousness in a person, and representing the psyche as a whole. To put it simply, the ego is the center of consciousness, whereas the Self is the center of the total personality, which includes consciousness, the unconscious, and the ego.    
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Anima and Animus

“When animus and anima meet, the animus draws his sword of power and the anima ejects her poison of illusion and seduction. The outcome need not always be negative, since the two are equally likely to fall in love (a special instance of love at first sight).” page 4019, “Aion”, Volume 3 by C.G. Jung Explanation: The anima and animus can be identified as the totality of the unconscious feminine psychological qualities that a man possesses or the masculine ones possessed by a woman, respectively. Because a male’s sensitivity is often lesser or repressed, the anima is one of the most significant autonomous complexes of all. It also influences a man’s interactions with women and his attitudes toward them and vice versa for women and the animus. Connection: A bird was used by C.G. Jung to describe an archetype, so 2 birds (animus and anima) were used for this purpose in the painting.
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Circle of life (SOLD)

“And just as the human body today represents in each of its parts the result of this evolution, and everywhere still shows traces of its earlier stages so the same may be said of the psyche. Consciousness began its evolution from an animal-like state which seems to us unconscious, and the same process of differentiation is repeated in every child. The psyche of the child in its preconscious state is anything but a tabula rasa; it is already preformed in a recognizably individual way, and is moreover equipped with all specifically human instincts, as well as with the a priori foundations of the higher functions.” page 348, “Memories, Dreams, Reflections” by C. G. Jung Explanation: Each half of a person’s life can itself be divided into two stages which are also typically separated by a psychological crisis. Thus we can identify four major stages of life. The adolescent crisis is marked by the struggle for independence from parents and adjustment to new sexual feelings and relationships. The mid-life crisis is generally associated with assessing and questioning the success of one’s outer life (career, family relations, etc.) and a turning inwards to recognise the call of strange unconscious impulses. The late […]
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The collective unconscious (SOLD)

“It must be pointed out that just as the human body shows a common anatomy over and above all racial differences, so, too, the psyche possesses a common substratum transcending all differences in culture and consciousness. I have called this substratum the collective unconscious. This unconscious psyche, common to all mankind, does not consist merely of contents capable of becoming conscious, but of latent dispositions towards certain identical reactions.” page 6060, Volume 3, “The Collected works” by C.G. Jung Explanation: Collective unconscious refers to structures of the unconscious mind which are shared among beings of the same species. This collective unconscious does not develop individually but is inherited. It consists of pre-existent forms, the archetypes, which can only become conscious secondarily and which give definite form to certain psychic contents. Connection: The eye is the collective unconscious, hands are our unknown psychic instincts, which are inherited, bugs are our fears and lizards are wisdom.
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Persona and collective (SOLD)

“When we analyse the persona we strip off the mask, and discover that what seemed to be individual is at bottom collective; in other words, that the persona was only a mask of the collective psyche. ” page 2925, Volume 2, “The collected works” by C.G. Jung Explanation: A psychological understanding of the persona as a function of relationship to the outside world makes it possible to assume and drop one at will. Money, respect and power come to those who can perform singlemindedly and well in a social role. From being a useful convenience, therefore, the persona may become a trap and a source of neurosis. Among the consequences of identifying with a persona are: we lose sight of who we are without a protective covering; our reactions are predetermined by collective expectations (we do and think and feel what our persona “should” do, think and feel); those close to us complain of our emotional distance; and we cannot imagine life without it. Connection: On the one hand, we meet a lot of people every day, we form our opinions of them according to their behaviour and we think that we know them; on the other hand, people play […]
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The symbolic life

“Now, we have no symbolic life, and we are all badly in need of the symbolic life. Only the symbolic life can express the need of the soul – the daily need of the soul – the daily need of the soul, mind you! And because people have no such thing, they can never step out of the mill – this awful, grinding, banal life in which they are “nothing but”.” page 8123, Volume 3, “The Collected works” by C.G.Jung Explanation: Jung was working with Pueblo Indians who strongly believe that they help the sun to rise and it made their life meaningful. Now look at Americans; they are always seeking something. They are always full of unrest, always looking for something. What are they looking for? There is nothing to be looked for! That’s perfectly true. You can see them, these traveling tourists, always looking for something, always in thee vain hope of finding something. Just traveling, traveling; seeking, seeking. “What for?” That gives peace, when people feel that they are living the symbolic life, that they are actors in the divine drama. That gives the only meaning to human life; everything else is banal and you can dismiss […]
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6 pieces of nature (sold)

Our psyche is part of nature, and its enigma is as limitless. Thus we cannot define either the psyche or nature.” “Man and his symbols” by C.G.Jung Size: 11″x8.21″
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Symbols of nature

“Our psyche is part of nature, and its enigma is as limitless. Thus we cannot define either the psyche or nature.” “Man and his symbols” by C.G.Jung Size: 11″x8.21″
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Snake (SOLD)

“The feminine belongs to man as his own unconscious femininity, which I have called the anima. She is often found in dreams in the form of a snake.” page 1937, Volume 3, “The collected works” by C.G. Jung Explanation: A man who is not in touch with his inner feminine will project her qualities onto the women in his life. If he does not already believe that he has found “the one”, a man may go from woman to woman in search of the perfect one, not realizing that what he is searching for is something within himself. In her positive characteristics, the anima is a man’s connection to his own depths, most specifically to his intuitive, inner wisdom, something which is completely unrelated to his typically outward, rational thinking. Connection: Anima can give a man the same as positive qualities as negative ones. It was depicted as two sides of a snake with one head.
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